In Our Community

Assemblyman Moriarty Bill Aimed at Incentivizing Media Production in New Jersey Voted Out of Assembly

Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Moriarty entitled the ‘Garden State Film and Digital Media Jobs Act’ was voted out of the Assembly on Thursday, 59-14.

The bill (A-1038) provides a credit against the corporate business and gross income taxes for certain expenses incurred during the production of certain films and digital media content in New Jersey for the 2019 fiscal year up until and including the 2023 fiscal year.

After the approval of an application sent to the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury, taxpayers will be allowed a credit amount equal to 30 percent of the qualified film production expenses and 20 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses.

There are so many parts of our beautiful state which could be utilized for film, and so many of our residents who could contribute to these films. What this bill does is put the infrastructure in place to realize these possibilities. If the expenses are incurred for services performed and/or personal property used or consumed in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, or Salem County, the allowable credit increases to 35 percent and 25 percent respectively.

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified film production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
· at least 60 percent of the total film production expenses, exclusive of post-production costs are incurred in New Jersey, or the qualified production expenses exceed $1,000,000

· the film includes marketing materials promoting the state of New Jersey in the film and include an appropriate logo at the end of the credits denoting that the piece was filmed in New Jersey
· principal photography of the film commences within 180 days from the date of the application for the tax credit, or 150 days from the approval of the application

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified digital media content production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
· at least $2,000,000 of the total digital media content production expenses are incurred in New Jersey
· at least 50 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses are for wages and salaries paid to full-time or full-time equivalent employees in New Jersey

Both applicants for the film production and digital media content tax credits must submit a tax credit verification report prepared by an independent certified public accountant licensed in New Jersey and comply with the withholding requirements provided for payments to loan out companies and independent contractors.

There is a limit of $75 million in tax credits that may be accumulated during each year of the five-year duration of the bill for film production expenses and $10 million for qualified digital media content.

The bill was advanced by the Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 5.

Assemblywoman Mosquera Heat-and-Eat Bill Advanced by Assembly

Legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Gabriela Mosquera to ensure that struggling families have access to food and energy assistance was released Thursday by the full Assembly.

Many of us are lucky enough to not have to worry about how we are going to feed our children or keep them warm during the winter months, but this is a daily reality for many low-income families in our state. This will help ensure that struggling families will have access to the bare essentials – food on the table and safe, warm homes.

The bill could help about 160,000 families get increased assistance.
Before July 2014, the state made annual energy assistance payments of $1 to SNAP recipient households to qualify them for the heating and cooling standard utility allowance.

But under the federal Agricultural Act of 2014, households must receive more than $20 in annual energy assistance payments to maintain the household’s eligibility. The bill therefore ensures that eligible households that are not currently enrolled can receive the heating and cooling standards utility allowance, allowing them to receive more nutrition assistance.
Former Republican Gov. Chris Christie vetoed several efforts by Democrats to boost the energy assistance payment in recent years. Because of the vetoes, New Jersey families lost $90 per month of their nutrition assistance.

It’s been estimated that maintaining heat-and-eat benefits would yield up to $170 million in federal SNAP funds in New Jersey. Also, the state could likely use federal funds from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program to pay for the increase in energy assistance.
New Jersey Policy Perspective has estimated that keeping up to $170 million in federal SNAP dollars in New Jersey could result in an economic boost of up to $300 million.

The bill was voted out of the Assembly 62-8-0.

Assemblyman Moriarty Bill Aimed at Incentivizing Media Production in New Jersey Clears Assembly Panel

Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Moriarty entitled the ‘Garden State Film and Digital Media Jobs Act’ cleared the Assembly Appropriations Committee on Thursday.

The bill (A-1038) provides a credit against the corporate business and gross income taxes for certain expenses incurred during the production of certain films and digital media content in New Jersey for the 2019 fiscal year up until and including the 2023 fiscal year.

After the approval of an application sent to the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury, taxpayers will be allowed a credit amount equal to 30 percent of the qualified film production expenses and 20 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses. There are so many parts of our beautiful state which could be utilized for film, and so many of our residents who could contribute to these films,” said Moriarty. What this bill does is put the infrastructure in place to realize these possibilities.

If the expenses are incurred for services performed and/or personal property used or consumed in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, or Salem County, the allowable credit increases to 35 percent and 25 percent respectively.

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified film production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
• at least 60 percent of the total film production expenses, exclusive of post-production costs are incurred in New Jersey, or the qualified production expenses exceed $1,000,000
• the film includes marketing materials promoting the state of New Jersey in the film and include an appropriate logo at the end of the credits denoting that the piece was filmed in New Jersey
• principal photography of the film commences within 180 days from the date of the application for the tax credit, or 150 days from the approval of the application

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified digital media content production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
• at least $2,000,000 of the total digital media content production expenses are incurred in New Jersey
• at least 50 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses are for wages and salaries paid to full-time or full-time equivalent employees in New Jersey

Both applicants for the film production and digital media content tax credits must submit a tax credit verification report prepared by an independent certified public accountant licensed in New Jersey and comply with the withholding requirements provided for payments to loan out companies and independent contractors.

There is a limit of $75 million in tax credits that may be accumulated during each year of the five-year duration of the bill for film production expenses and $10 million for qualified digital media content.

Assemblywoman Mosquera Bill to Prevent Gun Violence among Individuals with Mental Disorders Clears Assembly

I sponsored A-1181 to prevent individuals with an elevated risk of engaging in violence due to mental illness from harming themselves and others.

The vast majority of people who have a mental illness will never commit an act of violence, but multiple mass shootings, domestic violence homicides and
suicides in this country could have been prevented if people known to have serious mental health concerns did not have access to a firearm.

Bill A-1181 would expand the “duty to warn and protect” by requiring practitioners of psychology, psychiatry, medicine, nursing, clinical social work or marriage and family therapy who determine a patient to be a threat to report the patient to law enforcement. If law enforcement determines that the patient has access to a firearm and has the means of carrying out a communicated threat of serious physical violence. The courts can order the patient to surrender any firearms.

If these conditions are met, the following actions can occur:

  • arrange for the patient to be admitted voluntarily to a psychiatric unit of a general hospital, a short-term care facility, a special psychiatric hospital or a psychiatric facility.
  • initiate procedures for involuntary commitment to treatment of the patient to an outpatient treatment provider, a short-term care facility, a special psychiatric hospital or a psychiatric facility.
  • advise a local law enforcement authority of the patient’s threat and the identity of the intended victim;
  • warn the intended victim or, if the intend victim is a minor, his or her parent or guardian if the patient is a minor and threatens to commit suicide or bodily injury upon himself, warn his or her parent or guardian.

 

Assemblyman Moriarty Named Assembly Deputy Speaker

Assemblyman Moriarty has been elevated to the position of Deputy Speaker in the General Assembly for the 2018-2019 legislative session. The Assemblyman, who is chair of the Consumer Affairs Committee, has been a member of the General Assembly since 2006 and served as the Mayor of Washington Township.
Throughout over a decade in public service, Assemblyman Moriarty has championed consumer protections, the fair treatment of employees, and residents’ safety. The Assemblyman’s leadership and experience have made him a valuable asset to other legislators.
As Assembly Deputy Speaker, Assemblyman Moriarty plays a key role in shaping the Assembly Democrats’ long-term legislative agenda. He may also preside over Assembly voting sessions when business takes the Speaker away from the floor.
Assemblyman Moriarty has already made an impact in his new role. To stand up for working-class families, he has helped pass legislation through the Assembly to guarantee equal pay for women(A-1) and paid sick leave for New Jersey workers(A-1827). The bill concerning paid sick leave will be considered in the Senate Budget and Appropriation Committee soon. Meanwhile, the Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act has passed both houses and is heading to the Governor’s desk for approval.
Additionally, the Assemblyman sponsored a package of common sense gun reform bills. This package includes provisions to reduce ammunition magazine capacity, keep guns away from dangerous persons, and require background checks for private gun sales. All of these initiatives have passed the Assembly and will be considered in the Senate before they head to the governor’s desk for approval.
Assemblyman Moriarty will use his experience from decades as a consumer affairs reporter and time as a public servant to continue to fight for working- and middle-class residents as Assembly Deputy Speaker.

Senator Madden Bill To Help Surviving Spouses Of Public Safety Workers Killed In The “Line-Of-Duty” Clears the Senate

 

On March 26, Senator Madden’s Bill, S376, which eliminates the eligibility time limit on tuition benefits for spouses of certain public safety workers killed in performance of their duties passed out of the Senate with a vote of 36 – 0.

Children and surviving spouses of certain public
safety workers, e.g., members of a police or fire
department, who are killed in the line-of-duty may be eligible for a higher education tuition benefit. Currently, however, this benefit is limited to eight years for a surviving spouse and eight years following high school graduation for a child. This bill would eliminate the time limit on spouses.

For such eligible surviving spouses and children, the State would pay tuition to a public university or at least partial tuition to a private institution. By
removing the eligibility time limit on spouses, this bill would open up educational opportunities and job prospects for many residents who were previously ineligible.

Senator Madden has seen first-hand how a death in the line-of-duty of a loved one can affect a family. Coping with the death of a spouse is never easy, but he hopes that by removing this time limit, at least some financial burden can be alleviated for those whose spouses paid the ultimate price in service to their community.

S376 now heads to the Assembly.