In Our Community

ASSEMBLYWOMAN MOSQUERA HEAT-AND-BILL ADVANCED BY ASSEMBLY

My bill A-3010, also known as the “Heat –and-eat” bill will help to ensure that struggling families have access to food, energy assistance and qualifying families to receive additional nutritional assistance.

Many of us are lucky enough to not have to worry about how we are going to feed our children or keep them warm during the winter months, but this is a daily reality for many low-income families in our state. This will help struggling families gain access to the bare essentials – food on the table and safe, warm homes.

Under A-3010, every household in the state
eligible to receive benefits under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) would receive a minimum annual energy assistance payment of $21 to qualify for a heating and cooling standard utility allowance which in turn qualifies them for additional nutritional assistance.

This bill will help about 160,000 New Jersey
families get increased assistance. Before July 2014, the state made annual energy assistance payments of $1 to SNAP recipient households to qualify them for the heating and cooling standard utility allowance.

Under the federal Agricultural Act of 2014, households must receive more than $20 in annual energy assistance payments to maintain the household’s eligibility. The bill therefore ensures that eligible households that are not currently enrolled can receive the heating and cooling standards utility allowance, allowing them to receive more nutrition assistance.

On April 12th this bill passed the Senate (34-2-4) and the assembly (66-7-6). It is awaiting the Governor’s signature.

 

ASSEMBLYMAN MORIARTY’S BILL BRINGING JOBS TO NEW JERSEY HEADS TO GOVERNOR MURPHY

Assemblyman Moriarty’s sponsored legislation, to incentivize the production of films and digital media content in New Jersey, recently passed the Assembly and Senate. Similar incentive programs have brought more studios and film production to other states. The increased production has led to more jobs for their residents and more investments in their local businesses.
Assemblyman Moriarty understands that New Jersey has so much to offer to the film industry. Our beautiful state could provide great scenery for films, and our residents are ready to contribute to them.

The bill (A-1038), known as the Garden State Film and Digital Media Jobs Act, provides a credit against the corporate business and gross income taxes for certain expenses incurred during the production of films and digital media content in New Jersey.

After the approval of an application sent to the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury, taxpayers will be allowed a credit amount equal to 30 percent of the qualified film production expenses and 20 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses.

Assemblyman Moriarty knows how vital film investment could be to our South Jersey community. As such, the Assemblyman fought to create a bill that would benefit our region. As a result, for expenses incurred in eight southern Counties the allowable credit increases to 35 percent and 25 percent respectively.

Now that the bill has passed both houses it will head to the Governor’s desk for his consideration. The legislation would take effect immediately upon being signed into law.

The Assemblyman has spent his time in the Assembly fighting for Main Street residents. This act joins other initiatives, such as required paid sick leave and protection from zombie foreclosures, in this fight. Assemblyman Moriarty believes that these tax credits will bring jobs for our residents and investments in our communities.

 

Assemblyman Moriarty Legislation Promoting Equal Pay for Women Now Law

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrat Paul Moriarty to promote equal pay for women was signed into law by the Governor on Tuesday.

The law (A-1) modifies current law, including the Law Against Discrimination (LAD), to strengthen protections against employment discrimination and promote equal pay for equal women.

Specifically, the law will amend the LAD to make it an unlawful practice for an employer to discriminate against an employee because the employee is a member of a class protected against discrimination by the LAD, by paying a rate of compensation, including benefits, to employees of a protected class less than the rate paid to employees not of the class for substantially similar work, when viewed as a composite of skill, effort, and responsibility.

The law prohibits an employer paying a rate in violation of the law from reducing the rate of compensation of an employee in order to comply with the legislation. It will, however, permit an employer to pay a different rate of compensation if they demonstrate that the differential is made pursuant to a seniority system or a merit system, or is based on legitimate, bona fide factors other than sex or other characteristics of members of a protected class, such as training, education, experience, or the quantity or quality of production, that each factor is applied reasonably, that one or more of the factors account for the entire wage differential, and that the factor or factors do not perpetuate a sex-based differential in compensation, are job-related and based upon legitimate business necessities.

The measure also prohibits an employer from taking reprisals against an employee for disclosing information about job titles, occupational categories, rates of compensation, gender, race, ethnicity, military status, or national origin of employees or former employees. It also prohibits an employer from requiring any employee or prospective employee to waive their rights under the law as a condition of employment.

This law is a significant step in the right direction towards closing the wage gap between men and women. After working with distinguished, brilliant women throughout both my professional career and my time in the Legislature, I know pay equity in our state has been long overdue and I am more than glad to see it finally come to fruition.

Finally, the law would require an employer entering into a contract with the State to provide information concerning every employee employed in connection with the contract, including information regarding the employee’s gender, race, job title, occupational category, and total compensation, and report specified significant changes in employee status during the contract.

The Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development is required to retain and make the information available to the Division of Civil Rights and, upon request, employees and their authorized representatives.

The measure, titled the “Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act,” is named after former New Jersey Senator Dianne Allen. Senator Allen was a pioneering broadcaster in Philadelphia and Chicago who left her job in 1994 after filing three complaints alleging gender- and age-based discrimination with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission for age and sex discrimination, noted the sponsors.

This law was also inspired by the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which was enacted in response to a Supreme Court Case in which Ledbetter claimed pay discrimination at her place of employment where she was earning over $1,000 less than her male counterparts.

Assemblyman Moriarty Bill Aimed at Incentivizing Media Production in New Jersey Voted Out of Assembly

Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Moriarty entitled the ‘Garden State Film and Digital Media Jobs Act’ was voted out of the Assembly on Thursday, 59-14.

The bill (A-1038) provides a credit against the corporate business and gross income taxes for certain expenses incurred during the production of certain films and digital media content in New Jersey for the 2019 fiscal year up until and including the 2023 fiscal year.

After the approval of an application sent to the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury, taxpayers will be allowed a credit amount equal to 30 percent of the qualified film production expenses and 20 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses.

There are so many parts of our beautiful state which could be utilized for film, and so many of our residents who could contribute to these films. What this bill does is put the infrastructure in place to realize these possibilities. If the expenses are incurred for services performed and/or personal property used or consumed in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, or Salem County, the allowable credit increases to 35 percent and 25 percent respectively.

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified film production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
· at least 60 percent of the total film production expenses, exclusive of post-production costs are incurred in New Jersey, or the qualified production expenses exceed $1,000,000

· the film includes marketing materials promoting the state of New Jersey in the film and include an appropriate logo at the end of the credits denoting that the piece was filmed in New Jersey
· principal photography of the film commences within 180 days from the date of the application for the tax credit, or 150 days from the approval of the application

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified digital media content production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
· at least $2,000,000 of the total digital media content production expenses are incurred in New Jersey
· at least 50 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses are for wages and salaries paid to full-time or full-time equivalent employees in New Jersey

Both applicants for the film production and digital media content tax credits must submit a tax credit verification report prepared by an independent certified public accountant licensed in New Jersey and comply with the withholding requirements provided for payments to loan out companies and independent contractors.

There is a limit of $75 million in tax credits that may be accumulated during each year of the five-year duration of the bill for film production expenses and $10 million for qualified digital media content.

The bill was advanced by the Assembly Appropriations Committee on April 5.

Assemblywoman Mosquera Heat-and-Eat Bill Advanced by Assembly

Legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Gabriela Mosquera to ensure that struggling families have access to food and energy assistance was released Thursday by the full Assembly.

Many of us are lucky enough to not have to worry about how we are going to feed our children or keep them warm during the winter months, but this is a daily reality for many low-income families in our state. This will help ensure that struggling families will have access to the bare essentials – food on the table and safe, warm homes.

The bill could help about 160,000 families get increased assistance.
Before July 2014, the state made annual energy assistance payments of $1 to SNAP recipient households to qualify them for the heating and cooling standard utility allowance.

But under the federal Agricultural Act of 2014, households must receive more than $20 in annual energy assistance payments to maintain the household’s eligibility. The bill therefore ensures that eligible households that are not currently enrolled can receive the heating and cooling standards utility allowance, allowing them to receive more nutrition assistance.
Former Republican Gov. Chris Christie vetoed several efforts by Democrats to boost the energy assistance payment in recent years. Because of the vetoes, New Jersey families lost $90 per month of their nutrition assistance.

It’s been estimated that maintaining heat-and-eat benefits would yield up to $170 million in federal SNAP funds in New Jersey. Also, the state could likely use federal funds from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program to pay for the increase in energy assistance.
New Jersey Policy Perspective has estimated that keeping up to $170 million in federal SNAP dollars in New Jersey could result in an economic boost of up to $300 million.

The bill was voted out of the Assembly 62-8-0.

Assemblyman Moriarty Bill Aimed at Incentivizing Media Production in New Jersey Clears Assembly Panel

Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Paul Moriarty entitled the ‘Garden State Film and Digital Media Jobs Act’ cleared the Assembly Appropriations Committee on Thursday.

The bill (A-1038) provides a credit against the corporate business and gross income taxes for certain expenses incurred during the production of certain films and digital media content in New Jersey for the 2019 fiscal year up until and including the 2023 fiscal year.

After the approval of an application sent to the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Director of the Division of Taxation in the Department of the Treasury, taxpayers will be allowed a credit amount equal to 30 percent of the qualified film production expenses and 20 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses. There are so many parts of our beautiful state which could be utilized for film, and so many of our residents who could contribute to these films,” said Moriarty. What this bill does is put the infrastructure in place to realize these possibilities.

If the expenses are incurred for services performed and/or personal property used or consumed in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, or Salem County, the allowable credit increases to 35 percent and 25 percent respectively.

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified film production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
• at least 60 percent of the total film production expenses, exclusive of post-production costs are incurred in New Jersey, or the qualified production expenses exceed $1,000,000
• the film includes marketing materials promoting the state of New Jersey in the film and include an appropriate logo at the end of the credits denoting that the piece was filmed in New Jersey
• principal photography of the film commences within 180 days from the date of the application for the tax credit, or 150 days from the approval of the application

In order to claim the tax credit for qualified digital media content production expenses, the following conditions must be met:
• at least $2,000,000 of the total digital media content production expenses are incurred in New Jersey
• at least 50 percent of the qualified digital media content production expenses are for wages and salaries paid to full-time or full-time equivalent employees in New Jersey

Both applicants for the film production and digital media content tax credits must submit a tax credit verification report prepared by an independent certified public accountant licensed in New Jersey and comply with the withholding requirements provided for payments to loan out companies and independent contractors.

There is a limit of $75 million in tax credits that may be accumulated during each year of the five-year duration of the bill for film production expenses and $10 million for qualified digital media content.