In Our Community

Indoor Dining & Movie Theaters – Reopen September 4th at 25% Capacity

Today, Governor Murphy announced that in addition to reopening indoor dining, movie theaters and other indoor performances venues may reopen on September 4th with a capacity limit at “the lesser of 25% or 150 people”.  Also, the limits at other indoor gathering such as religious services, weddings, funerals, memorial services, and political activities will be increased to the “lesser of 25% capacity or 150 individuals”.

Below, please find protocols for indoor dining:

  • No more than 25% capacity and parties capped at 8 per table
  • Maintain six feet distance between tables
  • Staff must wear mask at all time
  • Must wear masks when they are not in their seats
  • Food and beverages can only be consumed while seated
  • Windows must be open for air flow into the dining areas
  • Air Conditioner units must be turned for outdoor air flow into dining areas
  • Restaurants that provide food service at bar may allow dining while maintaining social distancing

Update – Businesses That May Open and What Guidelines Must be Followed

Below, please find updated information about the reopening of gyms on September 1, 2020.  It was also stated that indoor amusement businesses may reopen on September 1, 2020 with safety protocols being announced within the next few days.  
 
 
Businesses opening brick and mortar locations are advised, in addition to all State rules below, to follow CDC business guidance and OSHA workplace guidance, which includes: industry-specific guidelines for a variety of industries; a 35-page guide on preparing workplaces [PDF]; and record keeping requirements.
 
The CDC offers a decision-making tool to assist employers in making (re)opening decisions, especially to protect vulnerable workers. Employers with questions about their responsibilities regarding return to work can review the NJ Department of Labor’s site for Employers and Businesses.
 
Businesses That May Be Open
If your business is not a retail business, you have been allowed—and may continue—to operate, but you must let your workers work from home whenever possible. The U.S. Department of Labor has guidance on the Fair Labor Standards Act pertaining to your obligations to employees regarding telework. If you have employees that need to be on site, you must keep them to the minimum number needed for critical operations; examples of these include cashiers, store clerks, construction workers, repair workers, warehouse workers, lab researchers, custodial staff, and certain administrative staff. Any building open to workers must follow minimum cleaning protocols as described in Executive Order 122.
 
Retail businesses may be open to customerswhile following Department of Health Guidance for Retail Businesses [PDF], including limiting occupancy to 50% of store capacity, installing a physical barrier such as a shield guard where possible and wherever you cannot maintain 6 feet of social distancing, all required infection control practices, and mandating everyone in the store to wear face coverings. Indoor portions of retail shopping malls may be open, while common areas such as communal seating and food courts and entertainment businesses must remain closed.
 
Bars and restaurants are open for drive-through, delivery takeout, and outdoor dining, while following Department of Health Guidance for Bars and Restaurants [PDF] and Department of Health Protocols for Outdoor Dining [PDF]. The reopening of indoor dining spaces has been indefinitely postponed; indoor dining is not currently allowed. Restaurants may offer in-person dining service in areas with a fixed roof if two sides are open, comprising over 50% of their total wall space; under Executive Order 163, these areas are considered outdoor.
 
Microbreweries and brewpubs may be open for home delivery. Depending on the type of license they hold, outdoor service may also be allowed; business owners should consult Executive Orders 150 and 157 and the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control’s ruling [PDF] to determine if they qualify.
 
Personal care businesses may be 
open. These include: beauty salons; barber shops; cosmetology shops; day spas (but not saunas, steam rooms, or shared bathing facilities) and medical spas which solely perform elective and cosmetic medical procedures; electrology facilities; hair braiding shops; massage parlors; nail salons; tanning salons; and tattoo parlors. Licensed businesses must abide by the Division of Consumer Affairs’ comprehensive safety standards for Cosmetology, Massage, and Bodywork licensees [PDF], including providing services by appointment only, prescreening and temperature checks of clients and staff, and staff-client pairs remaining at least 6 feet apart unless separated by physical barriers. Tattoo and tanning facilities must follow Department of Health standards for tanning and body art establishments [PDF]. Everyone in a personal care business must wear a face covering; clients may receive services that require the removal of a face covering, provided that clients wear a face covering at all times before and after the service.
 
Child care centers may be open to all clients. The Department of Children and Families’ Child Care Safety Requirements [PDF] specify rules which centers must abide, and each child care center must submit an attestation to the Department of Children and Families no later than 24 hours prior to the anticipated opening date, or in the case of previously operating emergency child care centers, within fourteen days of the effective date of Executive Order No. 149, attesting that it will follow all applicable health and safety standards.
 
All outdoor recreational and entertainment businesses may be open, including outdoor amusement parks and outdoor water parks, following Department of Health Standards for Pools and Aquatic Recreation Facilities [PDF] and Standards for Outdoor Amusement and Water Parks [PDF], including that park attendance must be kept at 50% of capacity, face coverings are required of all staff and attendees where practicable, and rides must be configured to ensure 6 feet distance between groups and those waiting for rides.
 
Indoor recreational facilities, museums, and aquariums may be open, following all requirements of Executive Orders 157 and 158, including 25% capacity and required face coverings. Examples of indoor recreational facilities include indoor bowling alleys, batting cages, shooting ranges, and arcades, and facilities for activities like dance, karate, arts and crafts, music lessons, theatre programs, gymnastics, indoor tennis, and yoga. Pools may be open and must follow requirements in Executive Orders 153and 157 and the Department of Health Standards for Pools and Aquatic Recreation Facilities [PDF], including implementing a COVID-19 Pool Operation Prevention Plan.
 
Any activity in licensed health clubs such as gyms, fitness centers, or health facilities must comply with protocols for individualized training sessions in Section 10 of Executive Order 157, including limiting training to an individual and their household members, separated by room or floor-to-ceiling barriers. Gyms and fitness centers must remain closed for all other purposes, including classes. Effective Tuesday, September 1, 2020, gyms may reopen with restrictions including, but not limited to: 25% capacity; masks worn by gym-goers, employees, staff, and trainers at all times; fitness classes, pilates, and yoga classes with capacity limited to one customer per every 200 square feet of classroom space; logs maintained of when all gym members and staff are in the facility; equipment spaced to allow a minimum of 6-feet of distance between all gym-goers; and equipment only made available that can be properly sanitized in-between uses. The Department of Health will release in the coming days comprehensive health and safety guidelines that must be followed.
 
Casinos may be open, at 25% capacity and following all requirements from Executive Orders 157 and 158, the Division of Gaming Enforcement, and reopening protocols from the Casino Association of New Jersey, and they must submit a reopening plan to the Division of Gaming Enforcement. Racetracks may be open for in-person bets, including at their sportsbooks and lounges, as long as they abide by applicable gathering limits.
 
Hotels, motor hotels, motels, and other established guesthouses may be open and should adopt and implement written policies as defined in Department of Health Protocols for Hotel Sanitization [PDF].
 
Golf courses may be open as long as they adopt policies that include: tee times at least 16 minutes apart; limiting golf carts to a single occupant; restricting players’ ability to touch the flagstick, hole, and other surfaces; and requiring face coverings, sanitization, and social distancing. Four player tee-times, forecaddies, equipment rentals, and restrooms are allowed. Refer to Executive Orders 133 and 147 for all requirements.
 
Recreational campgrounds, both public and private, may be open. Certain other outdoor recreational areas and businesses may operate as well, within a capacity limit of 25 individuals.These include batting cages and golf ranges, shooting and archery ranges, horseback riding, private tennis clubs, and community gardens. Refer to Executive Order 147 for all requirements.
 
Municipal and private-club swimming pools may be openDepartment of Health Pool Standards [PDF] must be followed, which include but are not limited to: reduced capacity, social distancing in and out of the water, staff fever screening, and maintaining a patron sign-in sheet. Prior to June 22, pool facilities have been allowed to be open for the purpose of lifeguard training and lifeguard swimming lessons. Summer camps will be able to use their pools when they reopen on July 6.
 
Organized sports activities may operate. Activities will be limited to sports activities conducted outside, and there can be no contact drills or activities. Department of Health Guidance for Sports Activities must be followed.
 
Youth day camps may operate, including municipal summer recreation programs, only if they comply with required youth camp COVID-19 standards and they submit an attestation at least 24 hours prior to opening; see the Department of Health’s Youth Camps page for all guidelines and forms. Residential and overnight camps are prohibited from operating.
 
Career and training schools may be open, following protocols found in Executive Order 155.
 
Libraries may be open to patrons, following requirements in Paragraph 7 of Executive Order 157, including limiting capacity to 25%.
 
In-person clinical, lab, and hands-on programming at institutions of higher education may operate, subject to institution’s submitted restart plan.
 
Horse-racing can take place. Fans will not be allowed into racetrack grandstands.
 
Gatherings of vehicles, such as drive-in movies or religious services, are allowed, so long as all participants remain in their vehicle, all vehicles remain closed (unless the vehicles are at least 6 feet apart), organizers wear face coverings and all appropriate protective equipment, and contactless payment is offered.
 
Chartered-boat services, including fishing and watercraft rentals, may operate.
Transportation Carriers must comply with restrictions in Executive Order 125, which include, but aren’t limited to, allowing back door entry where possible, infection control practices, and requiring face coverings. Face coverings are required in all NJ TRANSIT and private-carrier indoor stations.
 
If your business falls into one of the blanket exemption categories, you may operate; these businesses include:
· Health care or medical service providers;
· Essential services for low-income residents, including food banks;
· The media;
· Law enforcement;
· Federal government operations, or the movement of federal officials in their official capacity.
 
Construction projects, including nonessential construction, may operate; construction projects must follow all protocols in Paragraph 2 of Executive Order 142, including social distancing, limited sharing of tools or machinery, limited meeting size and staggered start times, all required infection control practices and sanitation, and required face coverings.
 
Businesses That Must Be Closed
Indoor entertainment venues must be closed, including movie theaters, performing arts centers, concert venues, and nightclubs. Indoor amusement parks and water parks remain closed. Indoor amusement facilities may reopen Tuesday, September 1, 2020; guidance on health and safety protocols will be forthcoming.
 
Shared space tutoring service facilities remain closed to students and clients. Tutoring services may offer remote learning.
 
Other Information
Gatherings of individuals, such as parties, celebrations, or other social events, are allowed at limited capacities and also subject to all other current business closures and restrictions. Indoor gatherings are permitted at 25% of a room’s capacity or 25 persons, whichever is lower; an exception exists for weddings, funerals, and memorial services, and religious and political activities protected under the First Amendment, which are limited to 25% of a room’s capacity or 100 persons, whichever is lower. Attendees at indoor gatherings must wear face coverings and stay 6 feet apart. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 500 persons, with an exception allowing no limits for First Amendment-protected outdoor activity, including political protests or outdoor religious services. (The CDC defines gatherings to include conferences, large meetings, parties, festivals, events, weddings, and other types of assemblies.)
 
Manufacturing, industrial, logistics, ports, shipping, food production, food delivery, and other commercial operations may continue to operate; manufacturing, warehouses, and other commercial buildings must follow protocols as described in Paragraphs 3, 4, and 5 of Executive Order 122, including immediate separation of workers with COVID-19 symptoms, notification of any workers exposed to COVID-19, limited group size and staggered start times, all required infection control practices and sanitation, and required face coverings.
 
Marine terminals in the Port of New York and New Jersey are open and fully operational. For additional information and updates, please check the Port of NY & NJ website as well as register for Port e-alerts, log into the Port Truck Pass portal, or subscribe to the Breaking Waves newsletter.
 
Medical facilities may continue to operate. Medical facilities include any facility where a sick or injured person is given care or treatment, such as: doctor’s offices, hospitals, dentist offices, long-term care facilities, and other medical offices. Facilities conducting elective services are required to comply with Guidance for Hospitals to Resume Elective Services [PDF] and Guidance for Ambulatory Surgery Centers to Resume Elective Services [PDF]. Further NJDOH Legal and Regulatory Compliance documentation is available from the department as well.
 
Governor Murphy also signed Executive Order 108, which invalidates any county or municipal restrictions that conflict with Executive Order 107. The only exceptions are: 1) short-term rentals and online marketplaces offering lodging; 2) municipal or county parks; 3) beaches and boardwalks.
 
If any business is violating the required guidelines, you can report it to the State at covid19.nj.gov/violation, or to your Local Health Department, which you can identify with the Find Your Local Health Department tool.
 
Updated: August 26, 2020
 

Source: Executive Order Nos. 
107108110133,142147149150152153154155157161,163; Administrative Orders 2020-52020-62020-8, 2020-102020-132020-15April 18 Press Release on Marinas and Boatyards
 
COVID-19 Portal:

Updated Travel Advisory for Travelers Coming to/from New Jersey

Below, please find the most current information regarding travel restrictions for travelers coming to/from New Jersey.  Please note that the NJ COVID-19 Information portal is frequently updated. As of Tuesday, August 25th, the state’s 14-day quarantine applies to 31 states and U.S. Jurisdictions. Delaware has been removed from the list.

 Link to the NJ COVID-19 Portal:

https://covid19.nj.gov/

New Jersey welcomes travel to and from our state.

However, to save lives and prevent the spread of COVID-19, the State has issued an incoming travel advisory that all individuals entering New Jersey from states with a significant spread of COVID-19 should quarantine for 14-days after leaving that state.

Under the 14-day quarantine travel advisory announced by the Governors of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut, individuals traveling to or returning to New Jersey from states with increasing rates of COVID-19 are advised to self-quarantine for 14 days. This includes travel by train, bus, car, plane and any other method of transportation.

The 14-day quarantine travel advisory applies to travel from certain states identified as those that have a positive COVID-19 test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or have a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average (“impacted states.”)

As of Tuesday, August 25, there are currently 31 states and U.S. jurisdictions that meet the criteria stated above:

  • Alabama (added 6/24/20)
  • Arkansas (added 6/24/20)
  • California (added 6/30/20)
  • Florida (added 6/24/20)
  • Georgia (added 6/30/20)
  • Guam (added 8/25/20)
  • Hawaii (added 8/11/20)
  • Idaho (added 6/30/20)
  • Iowa (added 6/30/20)
  • Illinois (added 7/28/20)
  • Indiana (added 7/21/20)
  • Kansas (added 7/7/20)
  • Kentucky (added 7/28/20)
  • Louisiana (added 6/30/20)
  • Minnesota (re-added 7/28/20)
  • Mississippi (added 6/30/20)
  • Missouri (added 7/21/20)
  • Nebraska (added 7/21/20)
  • Nevada (added 6/30/20)
  • North Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • North Dakota (added 7/21/20)
  • Oklahoma (added 7/7/20)
  • Puerto Rico (added 7/28/20)
  • South Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • South Dakota (added 8/11/20)
  • Tennessee (added 6/30/20)
  • Texas (added 6/24/20)
  • Utah (added 6/24/20)
  • Virginia (added 7/21/20)
  • Virgin Islands (added 8/11/20)
  • Wisconsin (added 7/14/20)

Note: Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Maryland, and Montana were removed 8/25/20. New Mexico, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Washington were removed 8/11/20. The District of Columbia was removed on 8/4/20.

 

This list will be updated regularly.

 

The self-quarantine is voluntary, but compliance is expected.

 

We ask that you complete a voluntary online survey to provide information about where you are traveling from and your destination if you have traveled to, or are returning from, one of the states that has been designated above.

If you choose to provide this information, it will be shared with local New Jersey Public Health authorities and other third parties when required by law. Local health departments will contact you to remind you to self-quarantine and offer assistance including information about testing locations.

Access the survey by visiting covid19.nj.gov/njtravel or texting “NJTRAVEL” to 898211.

 

Please note that this advisory does not apply to individuals:

  1. Who passed through a designated state for a period of limited duration (i.e. less than 24 hours) through the course of travel.
  2. Who are passing through New Jersey on a layover for a period of limited duration (i.e. less than 24 hours) through the course of travel.
  3. Who are traveling to New Jersey for business matters that are exempted from the application of the travel advisory.
  4. Who are traveling to New Jersey and work in critical infrastructure fields, such as health care and federal, state and local law enforcement. Consult with your employer regarding whether there is industry-specific guidance that may apply to you.

Travelers and residents returning from impacted states should self-quarantine at their home, a hotel, or other temporary lodging. Individuals should only leave the place of self-quarantine to seek medical care/treatment or to obtain food and other essential items. As one example, no one who has traveled to or from a state on the COVID-19 hotspot list should be participating in or attending an in-person graduation ceremony.

 

For answers to commonly asked questions, refer to the Department of Health’s Frequently Asked Questions about the self-quarantine for travelers.

 

Exemptions

Business Travel


Individuals who are traveling to New Jersey from impacted states for business are exempted from the application of the travel advisory. This, for example, would include truckers driving from an impacted state to New Jersey, and any state, local and federal officials and employees traveling in their official capacities on government business.

Individuals traveling for business should still consider postponing travel to the extent possible. Individuals are encouraged to self-monitor for symptoms upon return from any travel to an impacted state, and employers should consider screening employees for symptoms before permitting them to return to work. Employees and employers should follow current CDC guidance regarding travel, available here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/travel-in-the-us.html

 

Critical Infrastructure Workers
Exceptions to the travel advisory are also permitted for individuals traveling to New Jersey from designated states who work in critical infrastructure, as defined by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. This would include, for example, health care workers and state and local law enforcement. The comprehensive list of critical infrastructure industries is available here: https://www.cisa.gov/identifying-critical-infrastructure-during-covid-19.

 

Critical Infrastructure workers who have had an exposure but remain asymptomatic should adhere to the screening, social distancing, and mitigation practices prior to and during their work shift, as outlined by the CDC.

Consult with your employer regarding whether there is industry-specific guidance that may apply to you (e.g. guidance for health care professionals: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-risk-assesment-hcp.html ). Please consult the DOH website and resources for additional details and information regarding isolation procedures for when a person under quarantine is diagnosed with COVID-19 or develops symptoms.

 

Seasonal Migrant Farm Workers

Migrant workers can continue to work with precautions. Critical infrastructure workers and employers should follow guidance from CDC, as well as NJ Department of Health, regarding strategies to limit disease spread.

 

Testing

Testing is available to everyone in New Jersey and is strongly encouraged for those who travelled to areas heavily impacted by COVID-19. To find a testing site near you, visit covid19.nj.gov/testing

 

If you are from an impacted state and get a diagnostic/virus test, you should still self-quarantine for 14 days. If you test negative, you are still advised to self-quarantine for 14 days because you remain in the incubation period. A diagnostic test is a point-in-time indicator from the date of when you were last exposed – in this case, being in a state with significant community spread of COVID-19.

 

If you are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days and at least three days (or 72 hours) after any fever is resolved and any other symptoms are significantly improved. You should only leave self-isolation to receive medical care and to obtain food or other essential items.

 

Additional Travel Guidance

Travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. You can get COVID-19 during your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can still spread COVID-19 to others. You and your travel companions may spread COVID-19 to other people including your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you were exposed to the virus.

 

Destinations may have travel restrictions or requirements, such as mandated quarantines upon arrival.

 

Check state, territorial, tribal and local public health websites for information before you travel.

 

If you are traveling internationally, check the destination’s Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information page for details about entry requirements and restrictions for arriving travelers, such as mandatory testing or quarantine.

 

Consult the CDC’s guide for additional advice and review their travel recommendations by destination.

Learn more about what to do if you are sick after travel.

Source: Joint Incoming Travel AdvisoryNJ DOH Travel Advisory FAQsCDC “Travel During COVID-19” Page

Water, Gas and Electric Companies Have Agreed to Extend Their Voluntary Moratorium Preventing Shutoffs Until October 15th

Today, Governor Murphy announced that the State’s public water, gas and electric companies have agreed to extend their voluntary moratorium preventing shutoffs until October 15th. In addition, the utility companies will offer customers a “flexible and extended Deferred Payment Agreement of at least 12 months and up to 24 months. No down payments will be required for this assistance.” Below, please find the press release with details about the announcement.

Utility Shutoff Moratorium also Extended until October 15th

TRENTON — Governor Phil Murphy today announced that the State’s public water, gas, and electric utility companies regulated by BPU have all agreed to extend their voluntary moratorium preventing shutoffs to both residential and commercial customers during the COVID-19 pandemic until October 15th. Additionally, the utilities will offer residential and commercial customers a flexible and extended Deferred Payment Agreement (DPA) of at least 12 months and up to 24 months. No down payments will be required for this assistance.

“Utility services are critical and must continue uninterrupted during this unprecedented time,” said Governor Murphy. “No one should have to make a decision on whether to put food on the table or pay for basic necessities. With today’s announcement, in partnership with our public gas, electric and water utilities, we are continuing our commitment to extend strong financial relief to residents and businesses as they navigate their way toward stability.”

“Governor Murphy and I remain committed to helping people stay in their homes with full access to basic utilities as we weather this storm,” said Lt. Governor Sheila Oliver, who serves as Commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs (DCA). “In addition to this extended moratorium on shutoffs and flexible deferred repayment plans, the State has also responded by expanding our energy and rental assistance programs to help residents get through this crisis. We encourage people to visit: nj.gov/dca/dcaid to find out if they are eligible for one of our assistance programs.”

“This has been an extraordinarily difficult time for New Jerseyans who have been unable to pay their utility bills during the COVID-19 Pandemic,” said NJBPU President Joseph L. Fiordaliso. “With the cooperation of our state’s utilities, we have been able to provide an important helping hand to those who need it. That assistance will continue with payment flexibility and an array of assistance programs to help protect those who are struggling.”

“The coronavirus pandemic has had a devastating economic impact on both families and businesses. The last thing anyone needs right now is to have their electricity or water shut off,” said New Jersey Economic Development Authority Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “The agreement Governor Murphy announced today is an important relief measure that will shield the most vulnerable families and businesses from the impact of this unprecedented economic crisis and allow us all to devote more time and energy to overcoming COVID-19 and preparing for a strong, equitable recovery.”

The utilities have been communicating with customers about available assistance programs, account balances, and payment status. Beginning in September, the utilities will accelerate those outreach efforts.

Customers may start to receive shutoff notices in September. Should that occur, those customers should contact their utility as soon as possible prior to October 15 to make arrangements to continue their utility service, to explore enrolling in a DPA, and to learn about what other assistance programs might be available. However, no customer will be shut off before October 15.

Although utility service shutoffs are still suspended, customers should make payments toward their utility bills if they can. If a customer is struggling to pay, they should ask their utility company about assistance programs and payment plans, and they can also check NJBPU’s “Assistance Programs” pagefor information about State programs that are available to eligible customers.

Today’s announcement does not apply to cable and telecommunications companies. Those providers are covered by Governor Murphy’s Executive Order 126 that prohibits these companies from terminating Internet and voice service due to non-payment until 30 days after the current public health emergency has ended.

NJBPU reminds and encourages all utility customers and ratepayers who have questions about their service to first contact their utility. A list of public gas and electricity utility company phone numbers is available here. If a ratepayer is unable to resolve an issue with their utility company, residents should contact NJBPU’s Customer Assistance team by filling out this online form, or by calling (800) 624-0241 and leaving a voicemail.

Gloucester County is One of Twelve Counties That Will Receive Funding Through the CARES ACT

Governor Murphy announced today that twelve counties will receive funding through the CARES ACT to help with costs due to the pandemic. Gloucester County is one of the counties that will receive the funding. The twelve counties previously were ineligible for funding, because of their population size. For more information, please see the press release below.

Governor Murphy Announces $37 Million in Funding for Counties to Combat COVID-19
08/20/2020
MOUNT OLIVE – Acting on a commitment to deliver relief to communities who were not eligible for federal funding allocated through the CARES Act, Governor Phil Murphy today announced $37 million in support for 12 additional counties to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding will be made available to counties in three separate tranches under one Memorandum of Agreement. The 12 counties include: Atlantic; Burlington; Cape May; Cumberland; Gloucester; Hunterdon; Mercer; Morris; Salem; Somerset; Sussex; and Warren. These counties were ineligible for Coronavirus Relief Funding because their populations are below 500,000.

“There is no denying that COVID-19 has placed an incredible amount of strain on resources across all levels of government,” said Governor Murphy. “I’ve been clear from day one of this crisis that we’ll spare no expense to protect the health and safety of New Jerseyans, and that requires us to provide our communities with the support they need. Together, this funding will help us save lives and emerge stronger as one New Jersey family.”

The first portion of funding, approximately $15 million in total, provides counties with a reimbursement for COVID-19 related expenses to date. This money represents 25 percent of the county cost share with FEMA paying the remaining 75 percent, along with other eligible Coronavirus Relief Fund expenses. These funds will be made available to all 12 counties upon signing the MOU and upon proper documentation of the expenditures. were made available to all 12 counties upon signing the MOU.

The second portion of funding will help counties stand up and maintain testing sites. All 12 counties will receive $357,500 for this purpose.

The final allotment is based on population size, and each county will receive funds from the CDC’s Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for the Prevention and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases to support ongoing testing of vulnerable and high-risk populations. Counties will receive this funding only after submitting a testing plan and gaining approval of that plan by the Department of Health. The sum total of this portion of funding is $17 million.

A breakdown of funding by county can be found here.

“No corner of our state has been immune from the pandemic as communities across New Jersey bleed resources to combat COVID-19 and maintain essential services, while revenues continue to plummet due to the pandemic’s economic fallout,” said U.S. Senator Bob Menendez. “While this funding will help alleviate some of the strain on local budgets, our towns, cities and counties need more federal assistance to address their growing needs. That’s why I am leading bipartisan legislation that will deliver robust, direct and flexible federal funding to every community in the nation, regardless of its size, in any new coronavirus stimulus package.”

Updated Travel Advisory for Travelers Coming to/from New Jersey

Most current information regarding travel restrictions for travelers coming to/from New Jersey.  Please note that the NJ COVID-19 Information portal is frequently updated. As of Tuesday, August 18th, the state’s 14-day quarantine applies to 35 states and U.S. Jurisdictions. Delaware is back on the list.
 
 Link to the NJ COVID-19 Portal:
 
New Jersey welcomes travel to and from our state.
 
However, to save lives and prevent the spread of COVID-19, the State has issued an incoming travel advisory that all individuals entering New Jersey from states with a significant spread of COVID-19 should quarantine for 14-days after leaving that state.
 
Under the 14-day quarantine travel advisory announced by the Governors of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut, individuals traveling to or returning to New Jersey from states with increasing rates of COVID-19 are advised to self-quarantine for 14 days. This includes travel by train, bus, car, plane and any other method of transportation.
 
The 14-day quarantine travel advisory applies to travel from certain states identified as those that have a positive COVID-19 test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or have a 10% or higher positivity rate over a seven-day rolling average (“impacted states.”)
 
As of Tuesday, August 18, there are currently 35 states and U.S. jurisdictions that meet the criteria stated above:
  • Alabama (added 6/24/20)
  • Alaska (re-added 8/18/20)
  • Arkansas (added 6/24/20)
  • Arizona (added 6/24/20)
  • California (added 6/30/20)
  • Delaware (re-added 8/18/20)
  • Florida (added 6/24/20)
  • Georgia (added 6/30/20)
  • Hawaii (added 8/11/20)
  • Idaho (added 6/30/20)
  • Iowa (added 6/30/20)
  • Illinois (added 7/28/20)
  • Indiana (added 7/21/20)
  • Kansas (added 7/7/20)
  • Kentucky (added 7/28/20)
  • Louisiana (added 6/30/20)
  • Maryland (added 7/21/20)
  • Minnesota (re-added 7/28/20)
  • Mississippi (added 6/30/20)
  • Missouri (added 7/21/20)
  • Montana (added 7/21/20)
  • Nebraska (added 7/21/20)
  • Nevada (added 6/30/20)
  • North Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • North Dakota (added 7/21/20)
  • Oklahoma (added 7/7/20)
  • Puerto Rico (added 7/28/20)
  • South Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • South Dakota (added 8/11/20)
  • Tennessee (added 6/30/20)
  • Texas (added 6/24/20)
  • Utah (added 6/24/20)
  • Virginia (added 7/21/20)
  • Virgin Islands (added 8/11/20)
  • Wisconsin (added 7/14/20)
  •  
Note: New Mexico, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Washington were removed 8/11/20. The District of Columbia was removed on 8/4/20.
This list will be updated regularly.
 
The self-quarantine is voluntary, but compliance is expected.
 
We ask that you complete a voluntary online survey to provide information about where you are traveling from and your destination if you have traveled to, or are returning from, one of the states that has been designated above.
If you choose to provide this information, it will be shared with local New Jersey Public Health authorities and other third parties when required by law. Local health departments will contact you to remind you to self-quarantine and offer assistance including information about testing locations.
 
Access the survey by visiting covid19.nj.gov/njtravel or texting “NJTRAVEL” to 898211.
 
Please note that this advisory does not apply to individuals:
  1. Who passed through a designated state for a period of limited duration (i.e. less than 24 hours) through the course of travel.
  2. Who are passing through New Jersey on a layover for a period of limited duration (i.e. less than 24 hours) through the course of travel.
  3. Who are traveling to New Jersey for business matters that are exempted from the application of the travel advisory.
  4. Who are traveling to New Jersey and work in critical infrastructure fields, such as health care and federal, state and local law enforcement. Consult with your employer regarding whether there is industry-specific guidance that may apply to you.
  5.  
Travelers and residents returning from impacted states should self-quarantine at their home, a hotel, or other temporary lodging. Individuals should only leave the place of self-quarantine to seek medical care/treatment or to obtain food and other essential items. As one example, no one who has traveled to or from a state on the COVID-19 hotspot list should be participating in or attending an in-person graduation ceremony.
 
 
Exemptions
Business Travel
Individuals who are traveling to New Jersey from impacted states for business are exempted from the application of the travel advisory. This, for example, would include truckers driving from an impacted state to New Jersey, and any state, local and federal officials and employees traveling in their official capacities on government business.
 
Individuals traveling for business should still consider postponing travel to the extent possible. Individuals are encouraged to self-monitor for symptoms upon return from any travel to an impacted state, and employers should consider screening employees for symptoms before permitting them to return to work. Employees and employers should follow current CDC guidance regarding travel, available here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/travel-in-the-us.html
 
Critical Infrastructure Workers
Exceptions to the travel advisory are also permitted for individuals traveling to New Jersey from designated states who work in critical infrastructure, as defined by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. This would include, for example, health care workers and state and local law enforcement. The comprehensive list of critical infrastructure industries is available here: 
https://www.cisa.gov/identifying-critical-infrastructure-during-covid-19.
 
Critical Infrastructure workers who have had an exposure but remain asymptomatic should adhere to the screening, social distancing, and mitigation practices prior to and during their work shift, as outlined by the CDC.
 
Consult with your employer regarding whether there is industry-specific guidance that may apply to you (e.g. guidance for health care professionals: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-risk-assesment-hcp.html ). Please consult the DOH website and resources for additional details and information regarding isolation procedures for when a person under quarantine is diagnosed with COVID-19 or develops symptoms.
 
Seasonal Migrant Farm Workers
Migrant workers can continue to work with precautions. Critical infrastructure workers and employers should follow guidance from CDC, as well as NJ Department of Health, regarding strategies to limit disease spread.
 
Testing
Testing is available to everyone in New Jersey and is strongly encouraged for those who travelled to areas heavily impacted by COVID-19. To find a testing site near you, visit covid19.nj.gov/testing
 
If you are from an impacted state and get a diagnostic/virus test, you should still self-quarantine for 14 days. If you test negative, you are still advised to self-quarantine for 14 days because you remain in the incubation period. A diagnostic test is a point-in-time indicator from the date of when you were last exposed – in this case, being in a state with significant community spread of COVID-19.
 
If you are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days and at least three days (or 72 hours) after any fever is resolved and any other symptoms are significantly improved. You should only leave self-isolation to receive medical care and to obtain food or other essential items.
 
Additional Travel Guidance
Domestic Travel
 
The CDC advises not to travel if you are sick, or if you have been around someone with COVID-19 in the past 14 days. Do not travel with someone who is sick.
 
If you’re thinking about travelling, consult the CDC’s guide to assess your risk and other considerations.
 
For up-to-date information and travel guidance, check the state or local health department where you are, along your route, and at your planned destination.
 
While you are traveling, it is possible a state or local government may put into place travel restrictions, such as stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders, mandated quarantines upon arrival, or even state border closures. Plan to keep checking for updates as you travel.
 
International Travel
The CDC recommends avoiding all non-essential international travel due to the global COVID-19 pandemic.
If you travelled internationally in the last 14 days, the CDC recommends you stay home, monitor your health, and practice social distancing for 14 days after you return from travel.
 
Learn more about what to do if you are sick after travel.